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Thread: 3D Modeling

  1. #1

    Default 3D Modeling

    There was a thread on here about building models, but I can't find it now. Anyway, I know some of you like to build models so I thought you might be interested in this.

    I've been looking into 3D printing to make some parts that I don't want to make over, and over by hand. One of the biggest hurtle is getting good 3D modeling software that isn't going to bankrupt you. The next biggest hurtle is learning how to use it.

    Not a problem for the first hurtle. There is a program called Fusion 360 that is free to students and hobbyists. (You can you tube it.) As to the learning. Well, if you're as new to this as I am the learning curve is almost vertical. But after 3 weeks of watching tutorials, and making unkind hand jesters at my monitor (I stopped yelling obscenities because I got tired of cleaning the screen) , I finally got something going. Needs work, but it's getting there. I suspect that once they have all/most of the bugs out it will go to a subscription service, but I can learn for free, and it might be worth the fee when and if that happens.

    Personally, I don't think 3D printing qualifies as scratch building, but for common parts like engines, engine parts, and drive line components it might be OK. I'm going to use the printed model to make a mold so I can cast the parts in low melt alloy. Pewter if I ever get good at it.

    First 3D project

    Coventry Eng.jpg.

    Scratch build transmission in 1/12 scale.(I really need to work on my painting, it's kind of lumpy) Got some dimension help from an MG Midget forum which is the only reason I have some pics of it.

    IMG_1256.jpg

    Happy modeling.
    Last edited by Bill Brehm; 07-23-2016 at 08:50 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    That's fantastic Bill. Now that I'm retired I finally have time to get back into building the car models I've had sitting gathering dust.

    DaveS
    Dave Slee (DaveS)
    #38 iRacing CanAm Racing Team


  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Vancouver, WA USA
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    1,875

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    Excellent looking transmission Bill, just needs a black-wash.

    ...get back into building the car models I've had sitting gathering dust.
    Same here Dave; 12 F1 cars, 2 Indy cars, 2 prototypes, 1 GT, 1 rally, 1 dragster engine and 1 street car (Ferrari F40), all waiting for me to get back to it. Problem is I have to reduce simracing time to do it.
    “My goal is to not be bored by what I do”

    Itzhak Perlman

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Boulder, CO
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    1,990

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Brehm View Post
    There was a thread on here about building models, but I can't find it now. Anyway, I know some of you like to build models so I thought you might be interested in this.

    I've been looking into 3D printing to make some parts that I don't want to make over, and over by hand. One of the biggest hurtle is getting good 3D modeling software that isn't going to bankrupt you. The next biggest hurtle is learning how to use it.

    Not a problem for the first hurtle. There is a program called Fusion 360 that is free to students and hobbyists. (You can you tube it.) As to the learning. Well, if you're as new to this as I am the learning curve is almost vertical. But after 3 weeks of watching tutorials, and making unkind hand jesters at my monitor (I stopped yelling obscenities because I got tired of cleaning the screen) , I finally got something going. Needs work, but it's getting there. I suspect that once they have all/most of the bugs out it will go to a subscription service, but I can learn for free, and it might be worth the fee when and if that happens.

    Personally, I don't think 3D printing qualifies as scratch building, but for common parts like engines, engine parts, and drive line components it might be OK. I'm going to use the printed model to make a mold so I can cast the parts in low melt alloy. Pewter if I ever get good at it.

    First 3D project

    Coventry Eng.jpg.

    Scratch build transmission in 1/12 scale.(I really need to work on my painting, it's kind of lumpy) Got some dimension help from an MG Midget forum which is the only reason I have some pics of it.

    IMG_1256.jpg

    Happy modeling.
    Off the top of my head, I can't quite come up with a mold material that is suitable for casting pewter, unless it is something like a ceramic slurry, as used in bronze casting (for one example).

    Now...unless I'm missing something, the typical "mold master" for such molds were often created from wax (the so-called "lost wax" casting method)...although these days it might be possible to use mold masters made from--3D printed from--some sort of low-temp melting resins (?).

    Or...are there RTV rubbers available now which can withstand the heat of the pewter-casting, such that the mold might even be reusable (at least for a short run of finished castings?).

    I just don't know any more...although I will opine that 3D modeling/printing, in whatever material, opens up a wealth of possibilities that simply didn't exist twenty years ago.

    Am I even CLOSE, Bill, as to the steps used in your current casting methods, or just hopelessly out of date now?
    Last edited by Christopher Snow; 07-24-2016 at 12:26 AM.

  5. #5
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    For free software, you might want to take a look at Blender. It's an open source 3D modelling program which is even used by gaming companies including the creators of Euro truck and American truck simulator. You can get it from their website or you can even get it through steam. Because it's open source, there probably are more than enough custom plugins which will allow exporting your creations in the right file format. But it does have a steep learning curve.
    My steam! Watch races live @ twitch

  6. #6

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    You can really get excellent results with Blender (can't use it but have seen the work done with it) but is more suited for architecture, interior design and that sort of thing. For free mechanical engineering modelling software I think FreeCAD would probably be better.
    "I was doing fine until about mid-corner when I ran out of talent."

  7. #7

    Default

    Thanks guys,
    Dave, I know what you mean about collecting dust, I just counted my un-built models at 54. We need to get to work.

    Jon, Painting is my nemesis. I have tried several wash recipes, and it never comes out right. I'll work on it though.

    Chris, I'm new to casting myself, but you can cast pewter in silicone (actually it's cured rubber. I think). https://www.smooth-on.com/tutorials/...r-mold-max-60/ I'm using a low melt alloy now that melts at 158 F for the moment. If it makes a nice casting I'll try the pewter. I've also heard that they can 3D print in metal now. Don't know much about that though.

    There is other free software out there, and Blender is highly rated. I like Fusion 360 because it uses what are called T-Splines to model complex contours like car bodies. (which is what I want to do eventually) It's kind of like dragging a solid into whatever shape you want, but it's a whole lot harder than it looks. Here is one video on it's use. https://gallery.autodesk.com/fusion3...344.1465947219 Click on the thumbnail at the bottom of the display window.
    .
    Last edited by Bill Brehm; 07-24-2016 at 11:13 AM.

  8. #8

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    Thought I'd follow up with the result of my first 3D printing.

    I made a mistake by removing most of the bolt holes when fixing the errors the printing company showed me. The error was that the walls where too thin. I found out later that if you bevel or round off the corners it won't see that as an error. It did print the small holes that remained (.023"), and could probably do smaller. This is just the way it came. I still need to do a small amount of cleaning up on it, but that was expected.

    This is really going to speed things up for me. The brass block I was making took several days to drill and saw out all the parts and solder them together, and I'm not even close to being finished with it. The block is only 1.5" long, and the smaller detail parts would be too small for these old eyes to see well, so as of today its been tossed into the scrape bin.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Calgary, Canada
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    This is excellent stuff Bill. Your 3D printed block looks great.
    I didn't know there were other scale modellers here!

    I am also interested in scale race car modelling. I also want to learn 3D modelling software, but haven't been able to pick one that I want to learn for both scale modelling and sim modelling with the right price(like free) Been 2D illustrating for a long time. Scale race car modelling even longer!

    Also been resin casting for many years. Just started using smoothon products this spring. They seem to have a learning curve compared to Alumalite.


    I have pewter cast in silicone moods before. It is a bit tricky as you need large pour entries and vents to get metal into and through the mold before it solidifies. But it is doable. Mold life is probably shortened, but I haven't done enough to know how much, only used it once for door hinges on a Ferrari Enzo IMSA GTS.

    Of interest?:
    Speed Details

    Cheers

    Stephen
    Last edited by smbrm; 08-16-2016 at 06:24 PM.

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    Fort Myers FL USA
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    Bill what was the expense of the 3d printing?
    Mark Ruggiero
    DiamondDog/Red Dwarf Racing

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