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Thread: 1975 Formula 1 World Championship Series, Season 7 - Spielberg Vintage - June 26th

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    Jason Whited's Avatar
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    Default 1975 Formula 1 World Championship Series, Season 7 - Spielberg Vintage - June 26th

    Welcome Drivers:
    Here are details for the 1975 Formula 1 World Championship Series, Race 5, Season 7. Using The "F1 1975" mod for Automobilista (AMS).


    (Att: All Drivers!)Drivers interested in registering for this series, !PLEASE GO HERE TO PICK A CAR AND FIND RELEVANT FILES!

    All drivers are welcome.

    Our Fourth Race is June 26th, 2018 at Spielberg , Qualifying at 8PM CST/9PM EST
    (Please be aware that a few slight changes have been made in the formation lap/starting procedure. Be sure to read and fully understand the formation lap/starting procedure before race time. Feel free to ask questions if necessary)

    For this series, we will be doing a server controlled formation lap followed by a re-grid and a standing start. The formation lap will be paced by the pole man at a speed between 50 and 80mph (80-130kph)

    Here is how it will work:
    Once we go to the grid at race time, the sim will tell us when to begin the formation lap. The formation lap will be single file .
    As we approach the grid area, we will begin to slow slightly in the final corner and will cautiously and safely find our spot to re-grid.

    This is easily identifiable. Each driver will be shown a red box around the appropriate grid spot.
    The sim will not start the countdown to green until every driver is in position, so do this safely, there is no need to rush it and cause an accident.
    Formation lap incidents will be penalized heavily in this series because of the more fragile nature of these cars, so be cautious!

    Once all drivers are in position, a set of start lights will come up on your screen and the countdown to green will begin as usual.

    (see Rules, Start Procedure and Full Schedule below)

    Location: Spielberg, Austria - 3.673 miles / 5.911 km
    Austria's premier circuit has lived through a number periods of decline, but appears once again to be in the ascendancy as a host of its country's Formula One round.
    It opened in 1969 as the Österrichring, built as a replacement for the unloved Zeltweg airfield circuit lower down the hillside which had been used between 1958 and 1968. Whereas Zeltweg was a flat, bumpy and uninspiring blast down parallel stretches of runway, the Österrichring was a fast and majestic ribbon of tarmac laid out among the scenic Styrian hills. From the outset it was a real driver's circuit, with every corner a fast sweeper taken in a minimum of third or fourth gear.
    From the startline, the circuit rose steeply to Hella Licht Corner, a fast right hander, before curling gently down to the Dr Tiroch curve, taken in fifth gear, then rising once more on exit to the top of the circuit. From here you could catch a glimpse down the valley to the pits below, before focusing ahead to the fearsome Bosch Kurve, a fourth gear right-hander with no run-off thanks to the grandstand on the outside, creating something of an arena for fans.
    By contrast, the next section – known as the Texaco-Schikane despite it being anything but a chicane – featured grassed run off areas, though even here there were perils as a steep earth bank awaited those who ventured too far off piste. After turning back on itself, the circuit climbed over a crest once more to the final corner, a fourth gear sweeping right hander, which seemed to go on forever and was renamed in the circuit's second year in memory of the late Austrian hero, Jochen Rindt.
    Home for the Formula One Grand Prix from 1969 to 1987, the Österrichring had a knack of throwing up unusual winners. In 1975, Vittoria Brambilla took his only race win for March in appaulingly wet conditions, a victory made all the more famous by his spin and crash as he acknowledged the chequered flag... A year later, John Watson scored Penske's only win and in 1977 Alan Jones won for Shadow.
    Safety was an ever-present concern thanks to the close proximity of the barriers and the high speeds. Tragedy struck in the warm-up for the 1975 race when Mark Donohue lost control of his March after a tire failed, sending him careering into the catch fencing at the first corner, flying debris from the car killing a marshal. While not seeming badly injured at the time, a day later Donohue lapsed into a coma from a cerebral haemorrhage and died, possibly as a result of striking his ahead against a catch fencing pole or advertising hoarding.
    The crash prompted the first major changes at the circuit, first a slight tightening of the first corner in 1976 and then the insertion of a chicane the following year. Still the circuit had its dangers. Stefan Johansson was lucky to survive a crash in practice for the 1987 race, when his McLaren struck an errant deer which had strayed onto the track. Deer and car were much less fortunate. Then in the race, multiple crashes on the narrow start-finish straight proved the final straw for the FIA, which dropped the Österrichring from the F1 calendar.
    In response, the circuit made changes, increasing run-off in a number of corners. At the Bosch-Kurve, in particular, this required a slight tightening of the corner so that it effectively ran on the inside of the previous tarmac, freeing up the space previously used to insert a gravel trap, slowing the corner but retaining much of its previous character. The main straight was also widened by three metres and selected other parts by two meters.
    It wasn't enough to win back the F1 brigade, but it did secure rounds of the new World Superbike Championship between 1988 and 1994. By 1995, the major race event was a round of the new German STW Cup for touring cars but, after a crash at the first turn which saw the Audi of Hans Stuck ride alarmingly up the earth bank, it was apparent that major changes were needed to secure the circuit's future.
    With funding from a major Austrian telecommunications company, the circuit was reborn in 1996 as the A1-Ring after a major rebuilding exercise during the off season. Hermann Tilke was employed to reconfigure the track so that it would once again be eligible for F1.
    Tilke dramatically shortened the circuit, bypassing the section from Hella-Licht and Tiroch with a new section ended in a tight hairpin before rejoining the old course on the Valvoline Gerade. The Bosch-Kurve was also no more, replaced by another tight hairpin, while a tighter 'Texaco-Schikane' section was introduced, with the cars following the line of the old course to a squared off Rindt Kurve to complete the lap.
    In addition, new pits and grandstand facilities replaced their ageing counterparts, while the new configuration included alternative short and club circuits for the first time. All-in-all, the modernisation project had cost a total of £32 million.
    The A1-Ring was a truly modern facility but there were many who lamented the loss of all of the fast corners for which the Österrichring was famed. Tilke's plan had been simple, however. By introducing tighter corners and hairpins, he hoped to increase overtaking opportunities. The racing action, when it returned in 1996 bore out that prediction and the following year the hills rang out to the sound of F1 engines once more. F1 action headlined circuit activities up to 2003, though the track was also used for F3000 and the FIA GT Series among others.
    Unfortunately, while the racing was generally good, the F1 event failed to make money and eventually was taken over by the local authorities. In 2003 Bernie Ecclestone cancelled the contract for the race in 2004 because of the Austrian government's support of anti-tobacco legislation in the European Union. The future looked uncertain for the circuit.
    After the loss of the F1 race due to the desire to expand the calendar beyond Europe, the circuit was sold to Red Bull's Dietrich Mateschitz in 2004 and ambitious plans were hatched to extend the circuit to the west, incorporating sections of the original course which had lain dormant since the rebuild. The £485 million project would also have seen facilities for a race school, auto museum, hotel and a home for Mateschitz's aircraft collection added within the circuit confines.
    In preparation, the pit buildings and main grandstand were torn down and an access trench carved through the main straight, cutting the track in two. Then came unexpected news; after a campaign by local residents, in December 2004 Austria's Environmental Senate blocked the proposals and work saying the project fell foul of noise and pollution regulations. Work was immediately halted and, with no pits, grandstands and a gaping hole in the track, there was no possibility of continuing racing.
    Mateschitz effectively mothballed the facility and, despite a number of abortive attempts by the regional government and other parties including KTM and VW to revive the circuit, it fell silent for the next six years. Eventually through, Mateschitz decided to bring back racing, as part of a wider project to support the local Spielberg economy and with an eye on recapturing an F1 race. As part of 'Projeckt Spielburg', Red Bull invested heavily in the circuit, adding a vehicle dynamics facility, off-road area and go-kart track, as well as two hotels and a country club.
    Renamed the Red Bull Ring, the circuit reopened in May 2011, with a demonstration of Red Bull racing machinery and round of the Historic F1 Championship. Later that year, DTM and the popular ADAC GT Masters made their returns at the facility and have become regular fixtures in the revived racing calendar.
    In December 2012, Red Bull contacted the FIA to say the track would be available to host a round of the Formula One World Championship in 2013, after a slot became available following the postponement of the Grand Prix of America. While this ultimately came to nothing, it at least served notice of the track's intent and, in December 2013, the FIA announced the return of F1 to Spielburg from 2014 onwards.
    Work was undertaken in 2016 for the possible re-instatement of the full long course, with the construction of a new chicane, roughly on the site of the old Hella-Licht-S, as well as at the Remus Kurve. No official announcements have been made by the circuit - possibly due to the need to get permits to return the full course to use - and it is not clear as yet what the long-term plan may be. In the meantime, the Grand Prix circuit was re-measured and from 2017 was listed as being 8 metres shorter, though in reality no layout changes have taken place.
    .................................................. ..............
    ~ In your TRACK list, the track is:
    " Spielberg \ Spielberg 1974 GP "
    .
    ~ Race length is 45 minutes.
    ~ Race Pit Speed 37mph/59kph (pitstop not required)
    ~ Do not use off-course areas to gain an advantage.
    .
    Race Day and Time: Tuesday, June 26th
    Server Name: MNRL CMSRACING.COM
    Qualifying at 8PM CST/9PM EST (15 minutes)
    Warmup, 5 minutes,
    Race Start: ( FORMATION/STANDING, SEE BELOW FOR START PROCEDURE )
    ~Server Settings

    .
    FORMATION/STANDING START PROCEDURE
    ...
    --------------------
    SINGLE FILE FORMATION LAP START!
    .
    WHEN THE STARTING LIGHTS COUNT DOWN TO GREEN, PROCEED SINGLE FILE AT A PACE SET BY THE POLE MAN.

    POLE MAN IS TO PACE THE FIELD AT A MINIMUM/MAXIMUM SPEED OF 50 MPH TO 80MPH/80KPH TO 130KPH (SLOWER AT TIMES FOR SOME CORNERS)

    PROCEDURE IN A SAFE MANOR LEAVING A REASONABLE GAP BETWEEN YOU AND THE CAR IN FRONT OF YOU.

    ~BRAKE WARMING IS ALLOWED BUT PLEASE DO SO AS TO NOT CAUSE STACK BRAKING OF THE CARS BEHIND YOU.

    ~ CAREFUL TIRE WARMING IS ALLOWED.

    ~IF YOU SPIN OFF THE TRACK DURING THE FORMATION LAP PLEASE REJOIN AT THE BACK OF THE FIELD.

    PLEASE BE PREPARED TO SLOW DOWN AT THE END OF THE FORMATION LAP TO ENTER YOUR STARTING BOX MARKED IN RED.

    ONCE EVERYONE COMES TO A FULL STOP AND ARE IN THEIR PROPER STARTING POSITIONS THE STARTING LIGHTS WILL COUNT DOWN TO GREEN.

    AT THE GREEN LIGHT BEGIN RACING.

    ~PENALTIES MAY BE ASSESSED FOR ANY UNSAFE MANEUVERS DURING THE FORMATION LAP.

    ~ORANGE ZONE RULES ARE IN EFFECT FOR THE START OF THE RACE


    .................................................. ...................
    Race review and penalties:
    The race review team will review the start after each race, as well as review any incidents for which an incident protest was filed, and issue any penalties as appropriate. The results of these reviews will be posted no later than one week before the next event. All drivers are required to read the race review/penalty thread before the upcoming race so that they will be aware if they are required to serve any penalties. Any driver receiving a penalty will also be notified via PM. NOTE: Unless otherwise specified in the driver briefing for an event, the review team typically will only review the start for each event. Therefore if you experience an incident during an event that happens after the Start, you will need to use our Incident Protest Form to file an official protest if you wish to have it reviewed.

    !!!PLEASE be familiar with CMS rules and regulations!!!
    Rules and Regulations
    Protests
    .................................................. ...................

    Server should be up shortly after the previous race.
    In the SERVER LIST, look for
    MNRL CMSRACING.COM ...

    1975 Formula 1 World Championship Series schedule is as follows:

    April 17th, 2018 - [Test Race] - Monza GP(Spring)


    May 1- Buenos Aires, Circuito °15

    May 15 - Interlagos Historic

    May 29 - Johannesburg Historic

    June 12 - Hockenheim '77

    June 26 - Spielberg Historic

    July 10 - Monza GP(Spring)


    Note: (If you are getting a Vehicle Collision Mismatch There has probably been an update to the Skin Pack and or Patch. Please download, reinstall.)
    (If you are getting an SRS Mismatch please download and reinstall the SRS update)
    (If you are getting other errors try this.)

    (Note: You May need to reinstall any SRS update after doing this)

    .................................................. ................
    Here is the link for our race password:

    Password

    Link for Automobilista (AMS) if you don't have it:

    Automobilista on Steam



    .................................................. .................................................. .......................................
    In addition to Registering at Champion Motorsports, you should
    also register here:
    Champion Motorsports Stats Database

    Only need to register once, this will enter you into the
    CMS points keeping and standings system.

    Also you can optionally sign up for the Seniors Championship if applicable.
    SENIORS CHAMPIONSHIP SIGN UP LINK

    Please Join Us on TeamSpeak. Here is a link for details TeamSpeak info.

    .................................................. .....................................

    SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS FROM THE CHIEF STEWARD:

    As usual, the lift/blip is in effect. Repetitive speedshifting
    will result in motor damage and failure.
    Lift and Blip Video
    Last edited by Joe Miller; 06-24-2018 at 10:42 PM. Reason: Fixed title to reflect proper track layout

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    Christopher Snow is offline Senior Community Leader
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    I thought "Spielberg Historic" was the version that sports the flat out, blind first corner. Niki Lauda called it "Hella-Light (Hella-Licht)" bend. But the track map shows the chicane...so I'm confused.

    As far as the first corner goes, there WAS no overhead bridge (I recall the sim version does have one), so the drivers had almost no visual references going up the hill.

    His book sports a photograph which makes this clear, btw, taken from the other end of the valley (probably above the last corner).
    Last edited by Christopher Snow; 06-22-2018 at 05:12 PM.

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    Jason Whited's Avatar
    Jason Whited is offline Senior Community Leader
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christopher Snow View Post
    I thought "Spielberg Historic" was the version that sports the flat out, blind first corner. Niki Lauda called it "Hella-Light (Hella-Licht)" bend. But the track map shows the chicane...so I'm confused.

    As far as the first corner goes, there WAS no overhead bridge (I recall the sim version does have one), so the drivers had almost no visual references going up the hill.
    It's my mistake. Need to edit it. It's actually "Spielberg Vintage" that we are using, not "Historic".
    There is no overhead bridge on the Vintage layout, and the first corner is flat out, no chicane.

    Thanks for noticing. I'll fix it.

    ETA: Fixed.
    Last edited by Jason Whited; 06-22-2018 at 11:23 AM.
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    Christopher Snow is offline Senior Community Leader
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    OK! Should be interesting, particularly without an overhead bridge for reference.

    Lauda (again), who was Austrian, had this to say about it in his first book, "The Art and Science of Grand Prix Driving" (1975): [This track had one of his "ten toughest or most interesting spots in F1 racing"]:

    Zeltweg

    I am not thinking here of the Bosch Bend with its attendent guard-rail acrobatics but of the almost inconspicuous up hill right-hand bend after the start and finishing line: This is the Hella Light Bend. The problems here are your fantastic speed--you will only just have reached maximum revs in fifth gear[*]--and the fact that as you come up the hill you cannot see the exit from the bend. So you get no help whatever in deciding just when to throw the wheel over. Not until you are actually over the brow of the hill do you find out whether you have taken it right or wrong. If you have begun cornering too soon, you find yourself on the very nasty cobblestones [**] that make up the shoulder of the track; if you have thrown the wheel over to the right too late, you will not make the exit from that bend and you will wind up in the guard-rail. Of course it depends how you have set up your car: if I have put on a lot of wing I can sail through it; but if I have set up the car for top speeds--which is in fact the best thing for this track--the bend is a nasty blighter. It is one of those places where you get no second chance: woe betide you if you begin to slide. That's why you have got to put your foot hard down, hard, hard, and tell yourself each time anew that that's the only way to take it.

    * The cars sported five speeds in 1975, so fifth was obviously the highest gear

    ** The cobblestones are those large, round, RAISED (except in our sims) concrete circles you see on the inside of the corners--there were two staggered rows of them at Ost-ring
    Last edited by Christopher Snow; 06-22-2018 at 07:52 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Christopher Snow View Post
    OK! Should be interesting, particularly without an overhead bridge for reference.

    Lauda (again), who was Austrian, had this to say about it in his first book, "The Art and Science of Grand Prix Driving" (1975): [This track had one of his "ten toughest or most interesting spots in F1 racing]:
    Chris,

    Is that the book you quote a lot regarding historic F1? Or are there more you have, quote and recommend?

    Also, will you have your hardware repaired in time for next Tuesday? This track drives well and I think you would enjoy racing these cars with us, especially here.

    Brette

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    Christopher Snow is offline Senior Community Leader
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brette Brooks View Post
    Chris,

    Is that the book you quote a lot regarding historic F1? Or are there more you have, quote and recommend?

    Also, will you have your hardware repaired in time for next Tuesday? This track drives well and I think you would enjoy racing these cars with us, especially here.

    Brette
    This is the one I quote most often, yes. Everything in it from technical car setup stuff to hard to find items about differentials ( ), to comments about driving technique, etc. Of Lauda's books, I regard it as the "best" of them, if only because it covers everything--his others are more personal and are necessarily focused more on his career (such as "My Years With Ferrari")...which is also interesting to me, but probably not to everyone.

    As to the hardware, I have it put back together, but cannot get it bled properly yet. So I'm going to take it apart again later tonight and incorporate a "drain valve"...US plumbing item...except that I'm going to put the valve at the very top of the fluid circuit to "drain" the air up and OUT (at least in theory). I'd use a 1/4"-18 NPT bleed nipple and do it the proper, automotive way, except that I can't find one.

    If the drain valve doesn't work, I will try to cobble up an impromptu fluid reservoir around a drain plug sunk down in the fluid...and open and close that with pliers. Annoying, but I should only have to do it once and then be done with it for another ten years or so.

    The first thing I hope to do it get in some time-trial laps at Feldbergring...so if you see me up there, you know I got it fixed.
    Last edited by Christopher Snow; 06-22-2018 at 07:53 PM.

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    Christopher Snow is offline Senior Community Leader
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    Books: One other I highly recommend, and particularly for those interested in F1 of the seventies is "The Anatomy & Development of the Formula One Racing Car from 1975" by Sal Incandela. I have the idea Sal was, at one point, a mechanic and he details in this book pretty much every facet of race-car engineering in the first 130 odd pages. From there, the last hundred pages focus on details of specific cars, from the P34 thru the Brabham BT52. Nearly certain the "F1 1979" mod team used this as a primary reference, though I can't point now as to why I'm so sure of it (I vaguely remember having some discussions with one or more of the mod team members about this book back "in the day").

    Lauda wrote a second technical treatise too after he came back out of retirement, with a particular focus on the new turbo engine designs (which clearly fascinated him): "The New Formula One A Turbo Age (1982)." This book, like the one above does also delve into the specifics and oddities of ground-effect cars. Lauda being Lauda, he did not structure this book quite the same as his first, and says, at one point: "I covered that in my other book"...so it doesn't discuss quite as many of the basics as his first does.

    That said, it does introduce new concepts like material design (Carbon Fiber was new to the scene), so I can recommend it simply because it's "of the era" if nothing else.

    I bought a lot of these texts then on the theory that it would be hard to find the data after years had passed...and because only books written at the time (or near the time) can truly give you the proper perspective and sense of a given era, I'm quite convinced.

    The best archives are personal archives...and libraries.
    Last edited by Christopher Snow; 06-22-2018 at 07:50 PM.
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    If we go 4 wheels across the white line in the "cobblestone" areas in the turns is that running off track or OK?
    The game is calling some cut tracks but not sure if it's when your in the "cobblestones".


    @Gilles,
    Tried to get on while you were online and it said track closed. Does that mean you were running quals?
    blue skies, jerry

    ------------------
    Pass carefully - Driver chews tobacco

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    Quote Originally Posted by jham View Post
    If we go 4 wheels across the white line in the "cobblestone" areas in the turns is that running off track or OK?
    The game is calling some cut tracks but not sure if it's when your in the "cobblestones".


    @Gilles,
    Tried to get on while you were online and it said track closed. Does that mean you were running quals?
    The white line that signifies the edge of track is the boundary, so two wheels in applies there. 4 wheels in the "cobblestones" is off track.
    Occasionally (if you don't "gain time") it will not give a track cut warning (or in case of practice/quali/warm up, it strips the lap time from you)

    Was just over at live racers a few moments ago, noticed it was in "race" session. That would be the reason session was closed.
    Matter of fact, it's still in race session, so I'll hop over there and fix that because I don't think Gilles can reset it by himself (though I thought we fixed it so a lone driver could do so)

    Try again in a few, I'll have it back to practice session then.

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