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Thread: Insane new H-Pattern Shifter from Pro-Sim $1565

  1. #1
    Jimmy Regan's Avatar
    Jimmy Regan is offline Member
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    Default Insane new H-Pattern Shifter from Pro-Sim $1565

    This thing is over $1565 for a H-Pattern shifter. Barry Rowland from Sim Racing Garage did a video of this thing.

    https://www.pro-sim.co.uk/shop/h-pat...ab-description

    It seems to be extremely well constructed and built like a tank but that price is nuts.

  2. #2
    Christopher Snow is online now Senior Community Leader
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    I have to commend them for an informative short synopsis, if nothing else.

    For those who might not know: When "gears" engage or disengage during a shift, it isn't the big, "power transfer teeth" (those huge, spiral shark-teeth on the outer rim of the gears) which mesh in and out, but instead it's the side teeth, either syncromesh (and its cones) or gear dogs, which do the work.

    If you aren't already aware, you might still notice in the photo of the "dog" gear...that the two ends of each of the six dogs are slightly undercut. Another way of saying it is that the TOP (in the photograph) side of the dog is longer in length than is the BOTTOM side, where it melds into the gear itself. The end result of this is that, when under power, or even when using the engine as a brake (both ends are undercut) the two slightly disparate angles PULL the gear and the selector gear together--the more the power put onto the throttle pedal, the more firmly each is drawn into the other. To pull the selector back out and away, a slight lift is required, before upshifting into the next higher gear. A dip of the clutch pedal, however, is typically NOT required. WHAAAAAaaaaam, lift, WHAAAAaaaaam, lift, WHAAAAammm, etc.

    What you can't see in the posted photo is that each of the many small teeth around the syncromesh gear also has a slight undercut, and for the same reason: The greater the application of power, the more firmly and solidly the gear and selector are meshed.

    Until the next upshift or downshift, that is.
    Last edited by Christopher Snow; 06-29-2018 at 04:17 PM.

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